All posts tagged: reflection

Quarter Life Reflections: 24 Things I’ve Learned in my 20s

At the age of 22, I moved to New York with a sense of naive idealism and a general lack of life & adult experience. 4 years later, I am still impractically idealistic (though less so) and I still have much to learn, but through the experiences I’ve gained and the people I’ve met in this city, I’ve discovered a couple of things about myself and life. Take risks and do what you won’t regret (even if it scares you, alot). Take risks and live outside your comfort zone because it’s precisely those scary, uncomfortable experiences that are the greatest source of growth and strength. Don’t compromise your own happiness in the pursuit of trying to please and make others happy. In my constant desire to make others happy and to avoid “hurting peoples feelings”, I have often made decisions that were not optimal for my own happiness because I prioritized other people’s happiness over mine. At the end of the day, it is your life and ultimately you are responsible for your own happiness and …

You are enough

I used to think that self-worth was something that you had to earn; as if you had to prove yourself to acquire value and qualify as a worthy human being. I thought that self-worth was rooted in the external; dependent on personal and professional outward “success”. Over the last year or so, I’ve come to realize that this ideology is deeply flawed. I had it wrong all along. Self-worth is not something you accumulate, it is inherent. Your sense of worth shouldn’t depend on external validation, it should come from within. If you don’t accept yourself and recognize your inherent value, you will never feel good enough, regardless of how hard you try and how much “success” you achieve. Ultimately, you will never be truly happy. Sure, external accomplishments might make you feel good about yourself momentarily, but relying solely on accomplishments to fuel your self esteem is problematic. If you equate personal success with self worth, then you may equate failure with not being good enough. If you subscribe to this type of mindset, it is harder to recover from failure or a setback. …

Action isn’t just the consequence of motivation, but also the source of it.

Oftentimes, we only do something if we are motivated to do it. And we only feel motivated when we feel that spark of inspiration. The problem with relying on motivation to propel us into action is that motivation is fleeting. It comes and goes, sometimes arbitrarily. I might feel motivated to do something one day, but the next day the motivation could be gone. Moreover, motivation is situational. It is based on how you feel at a given time. If you feel like doing something, you’ll do it. But if you’re not in the mood, you won’t. I’ll be the first to admit that I am very guilty of succumbing to this mindset. I allow my emotions to determine my actions. Too many times, fear, the desire to make something “perfect” (the antagonist of my productivity), or simply, my propensity to put things off (procrastination…) has inevitably led me to inertia; to not do that thing at all. The thing is, motivation alone is not enough. Far from it. The most successful people in the world seem to …

TEN THINGS I LOVE ABOUT NYC.

1. Everyone is equal. This is the first city I’ve lived in where I truly feel a sense of equality. It doesn’t matter what your skin color is, where you are from or what your sexual orientation is. In New York, everyone is treated with the same dignity and respect regardless of superficial differences. I have lived in societies where your skin color to a large degree, determines the potential and propensity for your success and achievement. In New York, your success is largely contingent upon hard work and perseverance, as opposed to factors that shouldn’t matter, like skin color. 2. Everyone is entitled to belong. In New York, one does not have to be of a particular race to feel more or less “American”, or to experience a sense of belonging. I have lived in countries which claim to be multicultural, yet do not have a truly inclusive national identity. In such countries, claims of multiculturalism obscure the underlying reality that certain racial groups are more readily embraced and accepted whilst other racial groups are …