All posts tagged: big apple

Falling in Love with East Village

I’ve decided to start a photo series and commentary centered around the neighborhoods and cities I’ve visited. To kick off this passion project, I’ll begin with one of my favorite neighborhoods in New York – East Village. A Cultural Melting Pot of Art, History and Good Food I moved to the East Village last September. Over the past 6 months, I’ve enjoyed exploring all this eclectic neighborhood has to offer. The more I discover, the deeper my fascination. The East Village — the blocks east of the Bowery between Houston and 14th Streets, was once considered to be part of the Lower East Side, but began to develop its own unique identity and culture in the late 1960s, when a flurry of artists, musicians, students and hippies began to move into the area. The neighborhood has since emerged as a center of the counterculture in New York, and is regarded as the birthplace of several artistic movements, including punk rock and the Nuyorican literary movement. It has also been the site of protests and riots. Although in recent decades it has been argued that gentrification has transformed the character of the neighborhood, East Village is …

TEN THINGS I LOVE ABOUT NYC.

1. Everyone is equal. This is the first city I’ve lived in where I truly feel a sense of equality. It doesn’t matter what your skin color is, where you are from or what your sexual orientation is. In New York, everyone is treated with the same dignity and respect regardless of superficial differences. I have lived in societies where your skin color to a large degree, determines the potential and propensity for your success and achievement. In New York, your success is largely contingent upon hard work and perseverance, as opposed to factors that shouldn’t matter, like skin color. 2. Everyone is entitled to belong. In New York, one does not have to be of a particular race to feel more or less “American”, or to experience a sense of belonging. I have lived in countries which claim to be multicultural, yet do not have a truly inclusive national identity. In such countries, claims of multiculturalism obscure the underlying reality that certain racial groups are more readily embraced and accepted whilst other racial groups are …